How to Make Whipped Honey (& 4 Easy Creamed Honey Flavors)

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If you have crystallized honey on hand, you’re ready to learn how to make whipped honey! Creamed honey seriously couldn’t be easier to make and tastes heavenly spread on toast or drizzled over yogurt!

glass jar with whipped honey on a vintage blue plate.

Have you ever had an old jar of honey change from a golden, smooth liquid into a chunky mess? Crystallizing is a natural process honey undergoes, especially when it’s been exposed to cold temperatures or moisture.

Although this crystallized honey is no longer ideal for spreading over toast, the good news is that you can easily turn it into something new and lovely: whipped honey! The whipping process breaks down those sugar crystals to make your hardened local raw honey perfectly spreadable again.

In this easy recipe, I’m breaking down everything you need to know about turning your solidified honey into the loveliest, most perfect spread for toast and more. Don’t forget to print your free creamed honey labels!

Do you love the sweet, floral flavor of honey? You’ll love making your own infused honey recipes to add extra flavor to teas, scones, and more! Try my vanilla honey or cinnamon infused honey for a special treat.

What is Creamed Honey?

Creamed honey is a specific type of honey made by whipping crystallized honey into a creamy consistency.

And no, there’s no cream involved!

If you’re a baker at all, you’ve probably had to “cream” your butter and sugar together. This term simply refers to a process of blending ingredients together until they’re smooth and creamy.

As you run the crystallized honey in your stand mixer, the large sugar crystals will break down into small crystals. The honey will take on a very pale, opaque color, sometimes even turning white.

It tastes just like regular honey, except I find it to be a bit toned down. It has a smooth, rich, marshmallow-like texture and delicious flavor. It’s not quite as intense so it adds a gentle sweetness and floral flavor.

Why you’ll love whipped honey


  • USE UP CRYSTALLIZED HONEY – I find raw honey tends to crystallize much faster than processed honey, which can make it hard to remove from the container. Whipping honey is a great way to get it back to a soft, spreadable texture without heating it up!
  • SMOOTH SPREADABLE CONSISTENCY – After whipping, the honey takes on a thick, creamy consistency that is much easier to spread on your buttered toast, etc. I love the texture and can’t ever believe honey can look like this!
  • TASTES AMAZING – After whipping in so much air, you can really taste every element of the honey in a new way. It mellows out that overly sweet flavor into something that reminds me of some sort of candy. If you’ve never tried it, you need to give this a try!
jars of homemade whipped honey on a marble tabletop.
Enhance creamed honey by adding your favorite herbs or spices, like this cinnamon creamed honey.

Creamed Honey Benefits

Since you are not heating the honey, creamed honey has all the same benefits as your favorite honey.

I like to use it when my raw honey crystallizes as it allows me to change the texture without adding any heat, which may break down the enzymes and proteins in raw honey.

One of my favorite benefits of creamed honey is that it lets you repurpose crystallized (solid state) natural honey without having to fuss with heating the honey to take it back to a liquid state. You just chuck it in the mixer and let it whip until it’s ready!

Equipment

Making creamed honey takes some time and your arms will surely appreciate it if you use some modern technology.

You will need:

  • A stand mixer or a medium mixing bowl with a high-powered electric mixer
  • An airtight container or glass jar
  • A silicone spatula to jar up the honey

I prefer to use my KitchenAid stand mixer for this process as I can let it run while I’m tinkering around in the kitchen. Since we will be whipped the honey for at least 20 minutes, this is a big help!

crystallized honey.

Ingredients

There’s only one ingredient required to make creamed honey: pure honey.

I recommend using raw, crystallized honey. Lighter honey varieties tend to whip easier and have a better flavor than darker honeys.

If you only have a little bit of crystallized honey, you can use it as a seed honey with liquid honey. You MUST have some crystallized honey or you won’t be able to whip it. Seed honey is just the little bit of crystalized honey you add to make your homemade creamed honey! 

So to recap, you can either use:

  • All crystallized honey
  • A little bit of crystallized honey with mostly liquid honey

Where to Find Raw Honey

Looking for the best quality raw honey you can find? Try your local beekeeper or visit your local farmers market.

This is a great way to not only find the highest quality honey available but to also learn more about your local food system.

Plus, local honey is made from the pollen of all the plants in your area. People have used local honey to reduce allergy symptoms for years, although the research is still out on whether it really works.

If those options aren’t available, look for the best organic honey here.

How to Make Whipped Honey

  1. In the bowl of your stand mixer, add your honey (or combination of honeys).
  2. Using the whisk attachment, whip the honey at medium speed for about 20 minutes to start. Check on the mixture every 5 minutes or so to check the color and consistency (the crystals should be very fine or not noticeable), and to scrape down the sides.
  3. After 20 minutes, the honey is usable, but not as stable and may separate over time. If you’re using it right away or within the next week or so, feel free to stop here.
  4. To make real creamed honey, allow the honey to rest after the first round of whipping then whip for an additional 20 minutes. Rest again, then whip for an additional 20 minutes. Stop when the honey is very pale in color (almost white).
  5. Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place.
Rub the creamed honey between your fingers or taste it to feel for sugar crystals. If there is still a lot, keep whipping!

Storing Whipped Honey

Honey lasts forever, so shouldn’t creamed honey last forever too? Yes and no.

Regular, unflavored creamed honey has the same shelf life as regular honey. It should be stored in a cool, dark area in an airtight container like a glass jar. Keep it at room temperature and avoid any major temperature fluctuations.

Flavored honeys are a little bit trickier because any liquids or fresh ingredients can go bad in the honey. I recommend storing the lemon and vanilla creamed honey recipes above in the refrigerator. This will keep those fresh ingredients from going bad and will last up to a year.

flavored creamed honey labels

Free Printable Labels for Whipped Honey

Want to add these simple labels to your jars of whipped honey? Simply click the link below to download.

Creamed Honey Uses

There are so many ways to use creamed honey. Here are some of my favorite ways to use it up:

  • Make homemade whipped honey butter
  • Drizzle over Greek yogurt with fresh fruit
  • Use as a topping for pancakes and waffles
  • Spread onto fresh dinner rolls
  • Spoon onto homemade bread
  • Jar up this delicious recipe for a thoughtful gift
  • Add additional flavorings for tons of flavor
  • Whip into butter for a homemade honey butter

glass jar of homemade whipped honey next to scones.

How to Make Flavored Creamed Honey

Once you know how to make creamed honey, you’ll quickly find yourself dreaming up delicious flavor combinations. It’s incredibly easy to make flavored creamed honey and I’m sharing a handful of my favorite mix-ins and tips below.

what is creamed honey cinnamon creamed honey in a glass mason jar.

Cinnamon Whipped Honey Recipe

This is the easiest way to make flavored creamed honey because you just have to add in ground cinnamon!

Add 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon (ideally organic Ceylon cinnamon) to your creamed honey during the whipping process.

If your batch of cinnamon honey crystallizes, whip it until it’s creamy!

Vanilla Creamed Honey

For the most luxurious creamed honey, scrape the caviar out of one organic vanilla bean. Whip it into the creamed honey. Store in the fridge for up to a year. If it separates, rewhip it.

This is a great way to use up my vanilla honey if it crystallizes, too.

Lavender Creamed Honey

My favorite way to make lavender creamed honey is to whip up a crystallized jar of my lavender infused honey. This honey already has a delicious lavender flavor and I’ve strained out the buds.

Another option is to add food-grade lavender oil to honey while it’s being whipped.

Raspberry Creamed Honey

Although we don’t want to add fresh raspberries, which will thin the honey, you can absolutely add freeze-dried and crushed raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, or more!

You’ll need approximately 2 tablespoons of powdered, freeze-dried berries per 1 cup of honey. Mix following the creamed honey instructions above and enjoy!

Tips & Variations

  • Rub the honey between your fingers. If you use only crystallized honey, you might not be able to get rid of all the sugar crystals. This doesn’t bother me, but I like to get rid of as much as possible. You can keep an eye on this process by rubbing the honey between your fingers. If it feels really gritty, keep going.
  • Add dried herbs and spices. Honey pairs really well with a variety of flavors. Add some dried cinnamon or vanilla bean to make a custom blend for your herbal teas or toasted English muffins.
  • Jar up some for gifts. Homemade whipped honey is a fantastic gift! Just add some to a small glass jar and pair it with a handwritten label. 
jar of whipped honey with whole wheat scones and tea.

FAQs

What’s the difference between creamed honey vs raw honey?

Technically, we’re comparing different states of honey. Raw or unprocessed honey is the simplest, purest form of honey. It’s spun to remove any particulates and is not heated. Creamed honey (also called spun honey) is made by whipping raw or conventional honey until it’s smooth and has a pale, opaque color. You can make creamed honey with crystallized raw honey or regular, conventional honey from the grocery store. It’s more about the crystallization process than the specific type of honey.

What is seed honey?

Seed honey refers to either crystallized honey or a previous batch of creamed honey you can use to introduce honey crystals into your batch of freshly creamed honey.

This term confused me when I first started creaming honey and made me think this process had to be way more complicated than I thought. Did I need to buy some fancy type of honey inoculator to introduce seeds or something??

It’s definitely way easier than that. Just remember that creamed honey relies on the natural crystallization process. You need a small amount of sugar crystals to start the process, otherwise, the honey will not change color or thicken up. Most people recommend using a 1:10 ratio of seed honey to regular honey, so you don’t need much to start the seeding process! This means you need just over 1 1/2 tablespoons of seed honey (crystallized honey or storebought creamed honey) to cream 1 cup of liquid honey.

Do you have to add liquid honey to make creamed honey?

No. You can make creamed honey by whipping just crystallized honey. Since this process takes a fair amount of time, many people like to add some liquid honey to make a larger batch and distribute the tiny crystals across a larger mixture. This results in a smoother consistency.

Related Recipes

pale creamed honey in a glass jar.
glass jar with whipped honey.

Homemade Creamed Honey (Whipped Honey)

If you have crystallized honey on hand, you're ready to learn how to make whipped honey! Creamed honey seriously couldn't be easier to make and tastes heavenly spread on toast or drizzled over yogurt!
4.4 from 12 votes
Cook Time 1 hour
Total Time 1 hour
Course Baking, Breakfast, brunch, tea
Cuisine American
Servings 17 tablespoons
Calories 64 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

All Crystallized Honey

  • 1 cup crystallized honey

Liquid Honey with Seed Honey

  • 1.5 tbs crystallized honey, or storebought creamed honey
  • 1 cup liquid honey

Instructions
 

  • In the bowl of your stand mixer, add your honey (or combination of honeys).
  • Using the whisk attachment, whip the honey at medium speed for about 20 minutes to start. Check on the mixture every 5 minutes or so to check the color and consistency (the crystals should be very fine or not noticeable), and to scrape down the sides.
  • After 20 minutes, the honey is usable, but not as stable and may separate over time. If you’re using it right away or within the next week or so, feel free to stop here.
  • To make real creamed honey, allow the honey to rest after the first round of whipping then whip for an additional 20 minutes. Rest again, then whip for an additional 20 minutes. Stop when the honey is very pale in color.
  • Store in an airtight container in a cool, dark place.

Notes

The yield for this recipe is just over 1 cup of creamed honey (17 TBS). Since the whipping process will add so much air, you may find that you can get more than 17 tablespoons out of your creamed honey! 
To make creamed honey, you need at least some crystallized honey. You can use either 100% crystallized honey or add some crystallized or creamed honey to liquid honey.
This is called seed honey and you’ll need about 1.5 T of crystallized or creamed honey to 1 cup of liquid honey.
Depending on the time of honey you use, the final color will flavor. Naturally light types of honey will become almost white. In these photos, you’ll see the wildflower honey I used turn a pale beige color.
Check for grittiness at least a few times while you’re mixing. If you’re still noticing lots of crystals, keep whipping. If there are just a few small crystals, you can stop.
Store creamed honey in a cool, dark place in an airtight container. It will be naturally thick and very creamy.

Cinnamon Creamed Honey

Add 1 T of ground cinnamon to 1 cup of honey.

Vanilla Creamed Honey

Mix the flecks from one vanilla bean in 1 cup of honey or whip crystallized vanilla honey. 
It’s best to store in the fridge to prevent any moisture in the vanilla bean from causing spoilage.

Lavender Creamed Honey

Whip up a crystallized jar of my lavender infused honey or add a few drops of food-grade lavender oil to honey while it’s being whipped.

Raspberry Creamed Honey

Mix 2 T of powdered, freeze-dried berries per 1 cup of honey. Mix following the creamed honey instructions above and enjoy!
Feel free to use any type of freeze-dried berry (blueberry, blackberry, strawberry, etc).

Nutrition

Serving: 1tbspCalories: 64kcalCarbohydrates: 17gProtein: 0.1gSodium: 1mgPotassium: 11mgFiber: 0.04gSugar: 17gVitamin C: 0.1mgCalcium: 1mgIron: 0.1mg
Keyword creamed honey, flavored honey, honey, infused honey
Did you try this recipe?Be sure to leave a star rating!

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7 Comments

  1. Thank you so much for this article. It’s very helpful and has a lot of great information for me to start out some whipped honey. I’m very excited. I live in Miami, and I’m wondering if I don’t have a cool dark place to store the honey in, what happens to the honey at say 80° or so? Or even hotter? Does it just become more runny or does the consistency completely change things ? Thank you so much!!

    1. Julie, I’m so glad this post is helpful! The honey will get softer in warmer temperatures, but because creamed honey is so thick to begin with, I think it’s worth a try. Mine stayed nice and thick here in Washington even on our hottest days, but Seattle and Miami are quite different. You can always experiment with just a cup and see how it goes!

  2. I just made this 2 days ago. The taste is amazing… I made it with vanilla. I think it did something wrong because mine is separating. Ideas as to why? Or how to prevent it.

    1. Ellie, That’s so interesting! I’m wondering if the oils from the vanilla beans are causing it to separate. I’d try rewhipping it to see if that helps!

    1. Cheryl, Thanks for your note! I just made a new batch of whipped honey this weekend and temped it for my own information. My batch was only at 82 degrees F. Granted, we are in a cold spell here in WA so the ambient temperature was probably lower than normal (mid-60s). I imagine it also depends on the type of mixer. For reference, I used a bowl lift KitchenAid.

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