Easy Homemade Lavender Sugar Recipe (From Fresh Lavender)

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One great way to preserve your lavender buds is to process into lavender sugar! You’ll have fun playing with that sweet lavender flavor in baking, teas, and more. The process is very simple and I’ll break it into easy steps for you in this lavender sugar recipe!

lavender sugar recipe

What is lavender sugar?

Simply put, lavender sugar is sugar processed together with lavender and then dried. It has a sweet fragrance from the lavender and can be used any time you use sugar! Infused sugars are an excellent way to develop flavor while also preserving the harvest.

Lavender sugar is absolutely delicious! I made this recipe with my 4-year-old niece and we both kept sneaking little pinches as we made it. It has a lovely scent and the flavor reminds me of Parma Violets.

And no, it definitely does not taste like soap. 🙂

How to use lavender sugar

  • Add some to iced tea for a light, floral scent.
  • Mix it into your sugar cookies or sprinkle some on your shortbread
  • Use it as the base for a lavender sugar scrub
  • Turn it into a simple syrup to make lavender lemonade
  • Sweeten your coffee or herbal tea
  • Sprinkle on scones for a hint of lavender
  • Caramelize on top of creme brulee

Is lavender really edible?

Yes! Technically all lavender is edible, although some types are so fragrant they’re unpleasant to eat. They’re typically used for making soaps and perfumes.

Culinary lavender is a better fit for baking and infusing. It has a milder scent and gives a lovely, slightly citrusy, floral flavor. We eat the buds and discard any leaves and stems.

Is the lavender in your backyard good for eating? The most popular type of edible lavender is English lavender and any of its cultivars. Fortunately, it’s also very common. Learn how to identify the different lavender varieties here.

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Should I start with fresh or dried lavender?

You can make your own lavender sugar with either fresh or dried lavender. However, this recipe is designed to make it using fresh buds at the start of the summer.

In this recipe, we’re going to blend the lavender and sugar together. If we leave the fresh lavender in the sugar, the moisture will cause the sugar to clump.

I like to solve this problem by drying it in the oven until the sugar clumps up. Then, I run it through the food processor one last time to get a smooth, clump-free sugar.

This approach fully distributes the fresh lavender oils into the sugar, which makes it more aromatic than working with dried buds. We’ll gently heat the mixture, locking those oils into place.

Plus, it’s perfect for the summer when you’re harvesting fresh lavender and don’t want to just dry it all!

lavender sugar recipe

What you need to make lavender sugar

Equipment

  • Food processor
  • Parchment paper
  • Baking tray
  • Mason jars

Ingredients

1/4 cup fresh culinary lavender
1-quart pure cane sugar (4 cups)

Lavender Sugar Recipe

  1. Remove the lavender buds from the stem. Measure out 1/4 cup worth of fresh lavender buds.
  2. Combine half a quart of granulated sugar and the lavender buds into the food processor. Blend for about a minute or until the buds break down into small pieces.
  3. Pour the lavender sugar and remaining half quart of sugar onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Stir together.
  4. Bake at 170 for 30 minutes to an hour until the sugar clumps together.
  5. Remove the sugar from the oven. Allow to cool.
  6. Either break the clumps by hand or add them back to the food processor. Simply pulse one or two times until the clumps go away.
  7. Store in an airtight container like a clean glass jar.

Storage notes

Since we’ve dried this sugar, it can last about a year in the pantry.

Consider storing your lavender sugar in small jars and to give as gifts. This would be an excellent hostess gift or housewarming present!

This recipe always makes a little more than a quart. You’ll need 4 half-pint jars, 2 pints, or 1 quart plus a container for any extra.

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FAQs

Do I have to bake the lavender sugar?

When I first made this recipe, I did not dry it out in the oven. Even right away, I could tell the sugar was starting to clump.

As I thought about it, I realized that any moisture left in the buds could possibly contribute to mold. Plus, culinary lavender is typically dried before consumption.

To make sure this recipe is safe for long-term pantry storage, I recommend drying it at the lowest temperature your oven can reach (170 F for most ovens).

(This isn’t really baking – this is the same procedure I use to dry green onions in the oven and make green onion salt)

how to make lavender sugar

Do I need to wash the lavender before I use it?

Great question! There are some great reasons to consider washing the lavender like removing dust, pollen, etc.

However, all of those little buds may be hard to dry off fully before using in this recipe. I did not wash my lavender before using.

If you do, allow it to air dry for 12-24 hours before using.

lavender sugar

Lavender Sugar (Made From Fresh Lavender)

Transform your lavender harvest into delicious lavender sugar you can use all year-long! This lavender-infused sugar takes teas, lemonades, scones, cookies, and more to the next level. Plus, this recipe is easy and comes together quickly!
5 from 13 votes
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Cooling time 30 mins
Total Time 1 hr 40 mins
Course Baking, Drinks
Cuisine english, French
Servings 4 half-pints
Calories 16 kcal

Equipment

  • Food processor
  • Parchment paper
  • Baking tray
  • Mason jars

Ingredients
  

  • 1/4 cup fresh culinary lavender
  • 1- quart pure cane sugar 4 cups

Instructions
 

  • Remove the lavender buds from the stem. Measure out 1/4 cup worth of fresh lavender buds.
  • Combine half a quart of granulated sugar and the lavender buds into the food processor. Blend for about a minute or until the buds break down into small pieces.
  • Pour the lavender sugar and remaining half quart of sugar onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Stir together.
  • Bake at 170 for 30 minutes to an hour until the sugar clumps together.
  • Remove the sugar from the oven. Allow to cool.
  • Either break the clumps by hand or add them back to the food processor. Simply pulse one or two times until the clumps go away.
  • Store in an airtight container like a clean glass jar.

Notes

This recipe makes enough for 1 quart of lavender sugar plus a little extra.
Feel free to scale the recipe up or down depending on your needs. You’ll need 1 tablespoon of fresh lavender per cup of sugar.

Nutrition

Serving: 1teaspoonCalories: 16kcalCarbohydrates: 4.2gSugar: 4.2g
Keyword lavender, lavender sugar
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

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homemade lavender sugar recipe

How will you use your lavender sugar?

I’d love to hear your ideas and get inspired to try something new! Share your plans in the comments below.

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12 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I’m so in love with lavender – like, ridiculously in love with lavender! This makes such delicate sugar. Perfect for tea parties and fairy picnics!

    1. I love that and totally agree about the tea parties and fairy picnics! What a sweet idea. We love this recipe and are so glad you do too!

  2. While I’m not a huge fan of lavender, you’ve got me thinking about all the other herbals I can try with sugar. Thank you!

  3. I have never knew you could make lavender sugar. What an interesting recipe. I will have to give it a whirl. Thanks for sharing!

  4. 5 stars
    Thanks so much for sharing your awesome post with us at Full Plate Thursday, 595. Hope you are having a great week and hope to see you soon!
    Miz Helen

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