How to Make Dill Salt (Dill Flavored Salt)

If you love the refreshing, herby flavor of dill weed, you’ll adore this dill salt! By infusing natural sea salt or kosher salt with fresh dill, every crystal of salt will take on that bright dill flavor, making it the perfect condiment to season veggie dips or sprinkle on your French fries!

glass jar containing an infused salt made with fresh dill and kosher salt.

As avid dill lovers, we’ve pretty much tried everything dill pickle flavored: potato chips, French fries, sunflower seeds, popcorn, etc. We love those zesty flavors and love to add dill to pretty much anything! After growing a nice harvest of fresh dill this year, I decided to preserve it using one of my favorite methods so I could enjoy that dill flavor all year long. 

Since my green onion salt is such a lovely treat, I was sure this dill sea salt would be just as great!

Why you’ll love this dill salt


  • So easy: This organic dill seasoning salt truly couldn’t be easier. You just blend the fresh dill and salt in the food processor then dry it out in the oven or dehydrator. Done!
  • Tons of flavor: By blending the salt with lots of fresh dill, you’ll be able to add a punch of flavor even with a little sprinkle of salt.
  • Homegrown: If you’ve got dill in the garden and aren’t sure what to do with it all, save a nice handful for this fun flavored salt!

What is dill salt?

Feeling a little confused about what exactly this dill salt recipe makes? This is an herb-infused salt. It’s a very simple, age-old process. Back in the day, you’d pulverize fresh herbs with salt in a mortar and pestle, then let the herby salt blend air dry to use it later.

There are two things going on here: you’re preserving with salt, which is a great way to avoid bacteria and mold, and you’re also dehydrating the fresh herb. This means you’re creating a seasoning that can last a long time and be used in a variety of ways!

I like to sprinkle this dill salt over toasted bread, use it to scramble eggs, or add it to my potato salads for extra dill flavor. Because it already contains salt, you can flavor and season your favorite recipes at the same time!

Note: This recipe is not for a dill pickle salt. I love those too and this recipe does have a bit of a pickle flavor from the dill, but it doesn’t have any of the tanginess of white vinegar or any onions or garlic. 

bright green dill salt in vintage measuring spoons on a wooden cutting board.

Equipment

Although this recipe can be made in a variety of ways, I like to keep it easy. After washing and drying the dill to remove any pollen or insects, I add the salt and the dill to my food processor and blend until they form a paste. Then, you want to spread the wet salt either onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a lined dehydrator tray. To make it easy, I used the silicone mat that fits my Excalibur dehydrator tray.

You’ll also need a jar or other airtight container to store the salt for later.

fresh dill and kosher salt on a marble background.

Ingredients

  • Salt: I highly recommend using good-quality salt for this recipe. I like to use kosher salt for all of my cooking, but this recipe is also fantastic with sea salt.
  • Fresh dill: You’ll need about a cup of packed fresh dillweed. Be sure to wash and rinse the dill thoroughly, as dill is known for attracting insects, like aphids.

How to Make Dill Salt

  1. Add the salt and dill to the bowl of your food processor or blender. Pulse or blend until the ingredients come together as a paste.
  2. Pour the salt mixture onto a lined tray on your dehydrator or a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  3. Place your oven at the lowest temperature or set your dehydrator to 105 degrees F. Let the salt dry gradually until it cakes together and has no more moisture. (In a dehydrator, mine took 4 hours at 105 degrees. In an oven, it’ll likely take closer to 2 hours.
  4. Remove from heat and allow the salt mixture to cool to room temperature.
  5. Fold the edges of the parchment paper or silicone mat together and press your hands along the side to break apart any clumps.
  6. Pour the salt into a jar and seal.
image of what dill salt should look like when fully dried.

Despite its nonstick reputation, silicone tends to cause tiny particles of salt or herbs to stick. It’s actually easier to use parchment paper, which will let the dill salt flow straight down into the jar.

Storing

Keep your dill salt in an airtight bottle or jar for approximately one year. Since the herbs are dry and mixed with salt, they can last indefinitely. However, the herbs will lose their flavor and potency after approximately one year.

How to Use Dill Salt

This is the best seasoning for any dill lovers! It’s a great way to add a bit of dill flavor to any recipe.

  • Sprinkle over scrambled eggs
  • Mix into egg salads or potato salad
  • Add as the perfect rub for white fish, like cod or halibut
  • Stir into cream cheese to enjoy on a bagel with lox
  • Season French fries or roasted veggies
  • Sprinkle over steamed broccoli or asparagus

This infused salt makes a great gift! Store it in little jars, add a nice label, and give it away for the holidays or as a housewarming gift.

Tips & Variations

  • If you’re a pickle addict, you can tweak this garlic salt to make your own dill pickle salt by adding a little citric acid or white vinegar powder plus a little garlic powder and onion powder.
  • Feel free to adjust the ratio of dill to salt. I used half as much salt as I did fresh dill, so there’s a pretty strong dill flavor in a tiny bit of salt. If you make a strong salt like this, you can always dilute it with more salt after it cools.
  • The amount of time it takes to dry this salt varies depending on whether you use an oven or a dehydrator and the temperature and moisture in your house. It’s best to focus on how the salt feels (it should clump together and feel very dry), not how long it’s been in the oven.
  • Since most ovens cannot get to 105 degrees like a dehydrator, it can be helpful to prop the oven door ajar with a wooden spoon. This lets some of the heat escape so your dill salt is drying at a lower temperature.
  • If you use coarse salt, you may want to add it to a grinder to break it into finer grains for serving.
bright green dill sea salt recipe on a wooden cutting board.

FAQs

How can you preserve dill?

If you’re lucky enough to have fresh dill in your garden, there are many ways to save some for later! – I like to dehydrate fresh dill and dill seed to use as spices.
– You can also mix the fresh dill with salt and dehydrate it for a delicious seasoning salt.
– For the pickle lovers, you can store fresh dill in a mild, white vinegar to make an infusion for salad dressings.
– For long term storage, blend fresh dill in olive oil then freeze it in an ice cube tray. Add a cube to your next tray of roasted potatoes or fresh pasta for pickle flavor any time.

What is the best type of salt to use for infused salts?

The answer really depends on your preference. I find sea salt and kosher salt to be pretty interchangeable for preservation projects.

The main difference is that kosher salt has anti-caking agents, which allow it to flow freely. Sea salt can clump when exposed to moisture and can come in a variety of grain sizes. Coarse sea salt may be too large to use as a finishing salt and would be best stored in salt grinder.

Since kosher salt has a smaller flake size, it’s a perfect in-between size for seasoning any dish, although it can be a little large to use as a finishing salt. I don’t recommend using table salt as it is far too salty, which makes it easy to oversalt things without getting enough dill flavor.

Can you infuse salt with fresh dill?

Absolutely! Salt is a great way to preserve fresh dill. I like to blend the salt and dill together and then gently dry them to make a dill-flavored salt that can be used in a variety of recipes. 

How do you store infused salt?

If you infuse salt with fresh herbs then dry the mixture in the oven, dehydrator, or even the sun, you’ll want to store the fully dried salt in an airtight container.

If you live in a really humid environment, it can be helpful to add a silica gel packet to the salt to keep it from clumping, but I find mine tends to last a long time and stay free-flowing when stored in a mason jar.

Since the herbs are fully dried, and the salt is a preservative, this dill salt will last for at least a year. The flavor will start to change and weaken over time, but the salt will last for a long time.

Related Recipes

For more fun food preservation projects, try these homegrown recipes!

pin for how to make dill salt.
bright green dill salt recipe in a glass mason jar on a wooden cutting board with fresh dill.

Dill Salt

Learn how to make delicious and aromatic dill salt using fresh dill and high-quality sea salt. Our step-by-step guide will show you how to create this flavorful seasoning that will elevate your dishes to the next level. Perfect for adding a subtle dill flavor to fish, chicken, and more!
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 5 minutes
Course Appetizer, Baking, Breakfast, Food preservation
Cuisine American, british, german
Servings 48 servings
Calories 0.4 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup fresh dill, washed, dried, and packed
  • 1/2 cup kosher salt or sea salt

Instructions
 

  • Add the salt and dill to the bowl of your food processor or blender. Pulse or blend until the ingredients come together as a paste.
  • Pour the salt mixture onto a lined tray on your dehydrator or a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  • Place your oven at the lowest temperature or set your dehydrator to 105 degrees F. Let the salt dry gradually until it cakes together and has no more moisture.
  • Remove from heat and allow the salt mixture to cool to room temperature.
  • Fold the edges of the parchment paper or silicone mat together and press your hands along the side to break apart any clumps.
  • Pour the salt into a jar and seal.

Notes

  • If using a dehydrator, your dill salt will be done in 3-4 hours. In an oven on the lowest setting, it will take closer to two hours.
  • Despite its nonstick reputation, silicone tends to cause tiny particles of salt or herbs to stick. It’s actually easier to use parchment paper, which will let the dill salt flow straight down into the jar.
  • If you’re a pickle addict, you can tweak this garlic salt to make your own dill pickle salt by adding a little citric acid or white vinegar powder plus a little garlic powder and onion powder.
  • Feel free to adjust the ratio of dill to salt. I used half as much salt as I did fresh dill, so there’s a pretty strong dill flavor in a tiny bit of salt. If you make a strong salt like this, you can always dilute it with more salt after it cools.
  • The amount of time it takes to dry this salt varies depending on whether you use an oven or a dehydrator and the temperature and moisture in your house. It’s best to focus on how the salt feels (it should clump together and feel very dry), not how long it’s been in the oven.
  • Since most ovens cannot get to 105 degrees like a dehydrator, it can be helpful to prop the oven door ajar with a wooden spoon. This lets some of the heat escape so your dill salt is drying at a lower temperature.
  • If you use a coarse salt, you may want to add it to a grinder to break it into finer grains for serving.

Nutrition

Serving: 1tspCalories: 0.4kcalCarbohydrates: 0.1gProtein: 0.03gFat: 0.01gSaturated Fat: 0.001gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.001gMonounsaturated Fat: 0.01gSodium: 1179mgPotassium: 7mgFiber: 0.02gVitamin A: 76IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 3mgIron: 0.1mg
Keyword dill flavored salt, dill salt, dried dill salt recipe, fresh dill, how to preserve dill
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2 Comments

    1. Hi, Megan! Thanks for your question. You can use dried dill, but the proportions will likely need to be different. This recipe specifically infuses the dill flavor into the salt during the drying process. The dried dill won’t be quite as potent and it would be more like a spice blend, if that makes sense.

      Your shaker would contain two ingredients (salt and dried dill) that are not integrated whereas the dill salt in this recipe binds the dill to the salt.

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